Modern SF: Plots of Circumstance, Part 7

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My look at James Gunn’s Modern Science Fiction: A Critical Analysis continues.

We’re still in the “plots of circumstance” categories. To recap, these are plots with a protagonist struggling with some problem imposed on them by events in the world.

The next major category of this plot is “a past being in the past”.

It’s a strange plot category, and, if no story example comes to mind, that’s not surprising. After all, we’re dealing with historical people in an historical setting. That’s not the circumstance that readily comes to mind with the phrase “science fiction”.

Of course, Gunn firmly states the obvious. The past here is the author’s past. These are not time travel stories.

Theoretically, stories of set in the world of the author’s recent past could be done, but Gunn says he can’t think of any example he’s ever read.

So, authors using this plot, usually go back to a point in history incompletely documented, where mythology and folklore overshadow the historical record. These are stories of “mysterious archeological remains or historical situations”.

Only one story, in the five anthologies he sampled, fits into this category, and Gunn expresses his disapproval as to how this plot type has a “tendency to degenerate into adventure for its own sake”.

There are three subcategories of this plot. Continue reading